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2017 Annual Diocesan Stewardship Appeal: Our Vision, Our Mission

by John Mark Willcox The coming months will see our community of faith again striving to enable the work of Christ within our diocese by supporting our Annual Stewardship Appeal.  A new More »

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Catholic Youth Day Coming March 11!

by Nicky Prevou Middle school and high school youth and their adult leaders are eagerly looking forward to Saturday, March 11. Catholic Youth Day (CYD) 2017 will be held at St. Paschal More »

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God is Calling – Diocese in Search of New Deacon Class

by Deacon Mike Whitehead It has been a little over 11 years since the first Permanent Diaconate formation for the Diocese of Shreveport ordained 18 men in 2005, and three years since More »

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Community Volunteers Give Back to Catholic Charities

by Lucy Medvec As with any non-profit agency, the work and support from volunteers are important to the success of the organization. This is no different with Catholic Charities of North Louisiana. More »

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Bishop Friend’s Book Collection in Slattery Library

by Jessica Rinaudo The Catholic Center’s Slattery Library has recently had a huge boost to its book collection. Upon his passing, Bishop William B. Friend bequeathed his vast collection of literature to More »

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Vocations View: Want to Change a Life? Support Catholic Education

by Lisa Cooper Catholic vocations in all forms, from religious and priestly to living and working faithfully as a layperson all have to start somewhere. Oftentimes that place is in Catholic schools. More »

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Navigating the Faith: St. Blaise & the Blessing of Throats

by Dianne Rachal, Director of Worship The feast day of St. Blaise is celebrated on February 3 with the unique ritual of blessing the throats of those with throat disorders and anyone More »

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Domestic Church: Prayer Turns Burdens to Blessings

by Katie Sciba Andrew has been waking me early every morning. A little nudge and a “Were you going to pray?” I croak “Mm hmm.” He goes to a corner of our More »

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Mike’s Meditations: Who Do You See?

by Mike Van Vranken If the man in this picture came to our country claiming to be a displaced refugee fleeing persecution, would you vote to allow him to stay?  I read More »

Diocesan Wide Youth Rally Coming to Ruston in April

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by John Vining, Director of Youth and Young Adult Ministry

The Diocese of Shreveport is gearing up for its annual Youth Rally. This year the rally is headed back east and will take place at Louisiana Tech University in Ruston. This year’s event is chocked full of great speakers, breakout sessions and music. Here are the basics:

Who is coming?  Steve Angrisano!
Our diocese is extremely privileged to have a talent sof Steve’s caliber to minister to us this April. Passionate about youth, passionate about the message of Christ, passionate about ministry, Steve will bring inspiring messages to North Louisiana.

What will we learn and discuss?
Priests, religious men and women and the lay faithful will present topics on beliefs and practices, the faith community, scripture, pro-life and emotions from a Catholic perspective.

Where is this taking place? Louisiana Tech University
The Student center offers a large meeting space. Registrations take place at Tolliver Hall across from it, but I encourage you to pre-register with the diocese and purchase your t-shirt today! The cost is only $10 a person.

When? Saturday April 14 from 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Breakfast will be provided during registration from 8:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. Java City will be open if students and adults would like to purchase coffee.

What is the food like? Excellent!
During lunch the student center will open up Burger Studio, Montague’s Deli, and even Chick Fil-A. Prices are very reasonable.

Why go?
Your diocese has a passion for every person in North Louisiana and beyond. We earnestly endeavor to share the love of Christ with everyone we meet because we know Christ changes people! He heals, he provides, he nurtures people’s lives. Not only do we have a spectacular group of breakout session leaders, we also have a group of adults expressing their love for you as they devote their time. You will be encouraged, uplifted, prayed for and have your Catholic faith strengthened.

Please join our speakers, priests and a host of faith-filled youth coming together in Christ’s name the Saturday after Easter in Ruston. We have something wonderful to share: the Love of Christ!

Bishop’s Reflection (April 2012)

Three women bring ointment to Christ’s tomb and discover it open in this artwork attributed to illuminator Cristoforo de Predis. (CNS photo/courtesy of Alinari, Art Resource)

by Bishop Michael Duca

CHRIST IS RISEN! HE IS RISEN INDEED!

I have always been at a loss for how to greet people at Easter. I suppose the default common greeting is “Happy Easter” but that has always seemed too small for so wondrous a Solemnity of our Faith. It is also a little secular, mundane like “Have a nice day.”  The greeting I believe is big enough is the one above that comes out of the Eastern Catholic and Orthodox traditions. This greeting is not a simple desire that the other will have a good time but rather a PROCLAMATION that flows out of and draws us into the center of the mystery of our faith in Christ Risen from the dead for our salvation.  In my greeting/proclamation, “CHRIST IS RISEN!” and then the response of the other, “HE IS RISEN INDEED!” we are, in that moment of encounter, together the Church alive, proclaiming and giving witness to our common faith in the Risen Lord.

CHRIST IS RISEN! HE IS RISEN INDEED!

This past Lent was a hard Lent for me, not in my personal acts of penance or commitments of charity, but in having to face the realities that MAY come our way if the new HHS mandates do not restore our freedom to exclude birth control and other morally objectionable abortafacients and procedures for sterilization from the health insurance we offers our employees.  I have had some ask, “Why are the bishops being so difficult? It is not that big of a deal.” But IT IS A BIG ISSUE. I ask that you take the time to carefully read the statement of the American bishops on the next page that gives a succinct explanation of the issue at hand.  Facing this as a bishop is challenging, but it has been difficult also on a personal level. I have always, from my first moments of awareness, always believed that being a good Catholic and being a good citizen were not only compatible but also mutually beneficial.  I have always been proud of the history of our dioceses and religious communities who brought medical care and hospitals to remote areas in a time when we were still a developing nation. I am proud of how we cared for immigrants and created an education system of Catholic schools and colleges that still excel academically. I have cherished and thankfully prayed for the freedom we enjoy as Catholics to worship God without interference and to administer our Catholic institutions in light of that same faith.  It is personally difficult to consider the possibility of having to decide between being a good citizen and being a good Catholic. This is the possible BIG DEAL that we are confronting as a Church.

CHRIST IS RISEN!  HE IS RISEN INDEED!

Of course all these challenges to the Church bring to us an opportunity to consider the priority of our Catholic faith in our lives. This challenge to the freedom of religion, as big as it is, is nowhere near as big as the hope we proclaim in Jesus, the Way, the Truth and the Life, who was raised from the dead to save us from the darkness of sin and to take away the sting of death. In Jesus we have the true hope that gives our lives an eternal meaning, a hope that not even death can destroy. This same Lord comes to us in the celebration of the Mass as Eucharistic food, His true body and blood to strengthen us to become more like Christ each day.  This is the heart of the Church, it is our proclamation, our hope and our witness in the way we live our lives.  This is a freedom no one can take away.  So as difficult as my Lent has been I am not in any way without hope.  If it comes to a choice, I choose Christ.

CHRIST IS RISEN!  HE IS RISEN INDEED!

Maybe the difference in the Easter greetings gives us some insight. Happy Easter is a good greeting but a somewhat generic one that can come off the tongue almost without thinking, and is certainly not expecting a substantial response.  Whereas the greeting “CHRIST IS RISEN!   HE IS RISEN INDEED!” can not easily be said without us being pulled into the mystery of our faith, without giving a public witness of our faith, without considering what I truly believe and how it is reflected in my life.  The greeting expects a response that ties us together in that faith, that unites us in the Church.

CHRIST IS RISEN! HE IS RISEN INDEED!

The challenges before the Church today are calling us to consider whether our Catholic faith is just a generic title that has little influence in our lives or whether our Catholic faith is something that we embrace with a love that influences our whole lives and that we give witness to in the way we live.  Speak out against this coercive mandate.  Do not be pulled into the media downplay of the issue but continue to speak out against it.  Give witness to your faith in your life.  Do not just hope for a Happy Easter, but rather pray for a faith in Jesus Risen from the dead and in His Church that moves us to proclaim:

“CHRIST IS RISEN!” And to that I gladly respond, “HE IS RISEN INDEED!”